Getting sun burnt on the side of a big rock

I like diminutive titles. Something too grand, too pompous, and I don't even feel like reading myself. Mountains are large rocks with ice cubes on them. Sometimes, a bunch of smaller sharp rocks are piled on them (we call that scree, from the internal screems that it causes when you realize you have to climb it).

Sounds inoffensive enough. But I sure got pretty destroyed by this latest attempt on Shuksan.

The worst thing about exhaustion and sickness is that your camera becomes too heavy to use, and you end up with a collection of photographs inversely proportional to the length of the adventure. The following photo essay, I hope, still captures what it's like to go toe-to-toe with a glaciated giant (remember clicking on a photo will enlarge it, should you want a better look at it).

The huge traverse between the start of the Fischer Chimneys and Lake Ann. It takes a fast mover about 20 minutes to traverse this steep snow field, which explains why the next big party decided to simply camp before it. Can you see their tents?

The strato-volcano in the background in mount Baker, another icy giant that I had tried to climb previously. 

Joe heading out to the nice little stream by our camp. Having running water is a nice luxury, especially with that much sun!

Let's play a game of spot the alpinists. Bala and David finding their way under Hell's Highway, at sunset. We got back to the cars well after midnight.

The classic "videogame item seller look". One of the advantages of carrying all your sharp tools and screws ON your pack, as opposed to IN it, is that the clinking will alert all bears of your presence; no need for a bear bell.

It also won't tear your pricey pack to shreds, which is nice.

Bala topping out Winnie's Slide. The grueling 40 meters high slope is the perfect topper for a long day of climbing up chimneys in the scorching sun. Did you know it's called Winnie's Slide  because a woman named Winnie once slid down it, but then managed to stop herself before falling off the mountain? I know, that bit of folklore is a little disappointing.

Home sweet home. Those rocks may look a little jagged, but they actually are very comfy!